Shopping addict tried to commit suicide

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A Sutton woman who racked up debts of £50,000 spending on designer clothes told a This Morning TV audience her addiction made her try to commit suicide.

Sharon Bull had a comfortable lifestyle but developed an addiction to buying expensive clothes and holidays.

She likened her problem to alcoholism and said depression had led her to her habit.

Sharon had attempted suicide in 2011 after selling her home to pay credit card bills.

Speaking on Tuesday’s episode of ITV’s This Morning, Sharon said the addiction stemmed from a ‘lack of love’ for herself and has now written a book to help others deal with similar spending addictions.

She said: ‘Most people like a drink at the end of the week but if you woke up in the morning and the first thing you want is wine rather than a cup of tea it’s probably a problem. “What’s probably a nice habit, a nice leisure time for most people became an addiction for me.”

Sharon said she didn’t feel good enough despite having a successful career and that had played a big part in her addiction.

She told hot EAmonnn Holmes: “‘I had a good job and I actually was really good at the job but I don’t think I ever really believed that I was good enough,

“I do think no matter how much I would have achieved, what I bought, what I wore, I would have never felt good enough.”

Sharon sold her house to pay off her debts and had to live in rented accommodation for two years,

But she didn’t want to declare herself bankrupt because she wanted to ‘take responsibility’ for herself.

She was made redundant and felt ‘ashamed’ about her problems, but didn’t tell anyone until she tried to commit suicide in 2011 and confided in her mother.

Sharon said: “I actually tried to commit suicide, it got that bad. When I talk about it it is still quite raw for me even though it was that long ago.”

Eventually she was able to clear a big chunk of her debts by moving back home with her mother and selling her designer clothes on eBay.

Sharon has now written a book, called Stripped Bare, to advise on how people can deal with a similar shopping addiction.