Sheffield council considers community 'dumpster bins' in recycling shake-up

Recycling bins similar to the ones Sheffield Council hopes to introduce.
Recycling bins similar to the ones Sheffield Council hopes to introduce.

Sheffield City Council is considering introducing communal recycling bins in parts of the city to replace the existing provision.

In a consultation document, the authority is asking residents to decide whether they would sooner keep recycling bins in their own gardens, or opt for larger bins that would be kept permanently on the street.

The bins would be shared between six and nine households, while residents would retain black bins on their own properties.

Residents are being consulted in the Sharrow, Crookesmoor, Upperthorpe, Neepsend, Chapeltown, Woodseats, Stocksbridge, Deepcar, and Crosspool areas of Sheffield.

Streets affected by the proposal are Bowood Road, Bruce Road, Crookesmoor Road, Daniel Hill, Eastwood Road, Ecclesall Road, Green Street, Harcourt Road, Harvey Road, Haughton Road, Helmton Road, Hickmott Road, Howson Road, Marsh Street, Moor End, Neill Road, Ratcliffe Road, Sharrow Vale, Vernon Terrace, Wayland Road, and Westbrook Bank.

Sharrow resident Robert Dodds, who has received a consultation letter, is opposed to the shared bins.

“What they don’t tell you in the consultation letter is that you will get great big dumpster bin permanently on the street and these things really attract litter,” he said.

“And if only 30 per cent of those consulted respond, and only half of those wanted the permanent bins, we will all end up with them anyway.”

The council is targeting streets which have no front gardens, have steps leading down to the street from homes, or where three or more complaints have been made about bins being left out in the past 12 months.

Each property will share the use of two bins, a blue bin for paper and card, and a green or brown bin for glass, cans and plastic bottles.

The bins are similar to industrial recycling bins and will hold between 660 and 1,100 litres of waste, stand about five feet off the ground, are around four feet wide and three feet deep from front to back.

"Bins that are left on the pavement between collections are both unsightly and can often result in incorrect items being placed inside the recycling bins which means they cannot be emptied," the consultation document states.

"Bins left on the pavement, also make it difficult for wheelchairs and pushchairs to get past. The introduction of shared recycling bins would significantly reduce the number of bins on the pavement, making your street look tidier, and make it easier for people with wheelchairs and pushchairs to get past.

"The introduction of shared recycling bins would significantly reduce the number of bins on the pavement, making your street look tidier, and make it easier for people with wheelchairs and pushchairs to get past."

In Sharrow Vale, for example, there would be between eight and 12 bins

If 30 per cent of households respond, and half of those opt for the communal bins then the plan will be pushed through - on as little as 15 per cent stated support - the council said.

The consultation is part of wider changes to bin collections planned for the city.

The unpopular blue box will be replaced with a new brown bin to be used for glass bottles and jars, tins, cans and plastic bottles; while the existing blue bin is to be used for paper and card.

Sheffield Council agreed the change in December as part of a new deal with waste contractor Veolia, which it said would save taxpayers nearly £3.6 million a year, possibly rising by a further £1m.

Under the agreement, there will still be doorstep recycling collections every fortnight, but these will alternate between paper/card and other assorted recyclables, unlike at present where all recyclables are collected on the same day.

Last week, it was reported that Sheffield residents had called on landlords to do more following a spate of fly-tipping by students in the Broomhill area.

It is not clear whether the new communal bins are being introduced in certain areas to combat littering caused by a large density of students.

Sheffield City Council has also denied rumours that they are planning on switching to monthly black bin collections, after rumours emerged on social media.

Sheffield City Council has not yet commented.