Rich Ofsted praise for 'high quality' Catholic academy in Mansfield

A school serving Mansfield’s Catholic community has been richly praised by watchdog inspectors for “continuing to provide a high quality of education”.

By Richard Silverwood
Wednesday, 4th May 2022, 1:04 pm
Pupils at All Saints Catholic Academy greet Mansfield's Paralympic star Charlotte Henshaw and Mayor, Andy Abrahams, during an event at the school last September.

All Saints Catholic Voluntary Academy, which has 1,115 pupils on its books, has retained its ‘Good’ rating after a visit by Ofsted in February.

The inspection report read: “Leaders have high expectations of all. They ensure the curriculum is ambitious.

"Pupils are determined to succeed, and often work with great concentration in lessons. They achieve well.”

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All Saints Catholic Voluntary Academy on Broomhill Lane in Mansfield, which has 1,115 pupils.

All Saints is one of 21 schools within Nottinghamshire that are run by Our Lady of Lourdes Catholic Multi-Academy Trust, based in Nottingham.

The head teacher is Carlo Cuomo, who was “delighted” with the “strong, positive report” and said: “We firmly believe All Saints has high standards for all.

"Our students and staff are amazing. We feel extremely proud.”

The Ofsted inspectors lavished compliments on the Broomhill Lane school’s pupils who, aged 11 to 18, include 156 in a sixth form.

Head teacher Carlo Cuomo welcomes Mansfield's Paralympic star Charlotte Henshaw and Mayor, Andy Abrahams, to an event at All Saints Catholic Academy last September.

Their report said: “Pupils are determined to succeed, and often work with great concentration in lessons. They achieve well.

"They also have excellent manners. They will, for example, readily hold open doors for visitors.”

The report also hailed the environment created at the school which allowed pupils to flourish.

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"Pupils say they always have someone to turn to if they have a problem,” it said. “They are happy at school and feel safe.

"They have many opportunities to think about moral, social, spiritual and cultural issues.

"Leaders also offer a wide range of opportunities for pupils to develop their interests, including team sports. They take part in many other activities.”

All Saints was “a highly inclusive school”, where “pupils of all faiths or no faith feel included in school life”, the Ofsted report continued.

It promoted “kindness and compassion” and raised funds for charities. And its careers education programme included work-experience placements.

Meanwhile, bullying was rare, and safeguarding was effective.

Senior leaders “communicated well with staff”, whose workload was “carefully managed”.

The only area needing improvement concerned writing, spelling and punctuation.

The inspectors said: “Pupils in key stages three and four do not develop the skills or knowledge they need to produce extended pieces of writing independently without teachers’ support.

"Leaders should ensure they are supported to write with accurate spelling and punctuation across all subjects.”