Appeal for help to build sensory garden for 21-year-old with rare genetic disorder

The family and carers of a young lady with a life-limiting disorder are appealing for help to build her a garden.

Ellie Bradshaw was born with Rett syndrome, a rare genetic disorder which affects brain development, resulting in mental and physical disability.
The 21-year-old relies on her wheelchair and has 10 carers who work in teams of two to provide her with 24-hour care.
Ellie’s carers and family are now reaching out to the community to ask for their help to build Ellie a raised flowerbed, to “give her a purpose”.
Andrea Sherwood, one of Ellie’s carers said: “We want to build Ellie a raised flowerbed in her garden.
“We can grow vegetables and flowers and it would really give Ellie a purpose.
“Ellie can’t use her hands, so the garden will be something visual for her to get involved in.
“Ellie is wonderful, and her family are really lovely people.”
Ellie, who lives at home in Selston with mum Sally and dad Glyn, relies on her care team to support her.
Sally said: “We knew something was wrong with Ellie when she was 18 months old.
“Normally children are diagnosed with Rett syndrome at the age of three to four, but Ellie was diagnosed early, because we knew something was wrong.
“When her carers came up with the idea of a flower bed and vegetable patch, I thought it was great – I would never have thought of it.”
Since Andrea put a status on Facebook asking for donations of railway sleepers, topsoil and seeds, she has already had offers flooding in.
Sally said: “The response has been unbelievable, I was so surprised. A retiree has even kindly offered to come and help us build the garden.
“It shows real community spirit.”
To begin work on the garden, the family and carers need privacy panels , paving, flowers, herbs, vegetables, solar lights, planters, pots, a table, chairs and an outdoor umbrella.
Anyone who can help is asked to call Andrea on 07487 450609.

Ellie Bradshaw was born with Rett syndrome

Ellie Bradshaw was born with Rett syndrome