Notts firm ravaged by fire 'doesn't have a permit' to store waste

UPDATE: After three-days of misery for nearby residents, new light is shed on the company who's waste disposal unit went up in flames on Wednesday.

Friday, 23rd September 2016, 3:59 pm
Updated Tuesday, 4th October 2016, 2:15 pm
An Industrial Unit in North Notts caught fire on Wednesday, September 21. (Image: NFRS).

Firefighters were called to an industrial unit in Forest Lane, Walesby near Ollerton at 10.30am on Wednesday, September 21.

A blaze raged for three days at the site after authorities decided to let the building burn to prevent risks of contamination to nearby water sources.

Crews are now waiting as the building reduces toa smoulder and thinner white smoke is seen rising form what remains of the industrial unit.

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Nobile Foods' plant in Walesby has been burning into a third day after plastic waste caught fire - but Environment Agency officials have revealed that the company doesn't have a licence to store waste there. (Image James Day).

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But after news that the building to go up in flames was a waste facility, the environment agency has said Noble Foods did not have a permit to store waste at the site

A spokesperson for the Environemet Agency said: "It wasn't a permitted site and there were no observations for waste to be stored at the site.

Nine fire engines and over 50 team members were on site at the peak of the operation.

"A full investigation is now underway."

Noble Foods has facilities accross the UK, including a milling site in Bilsthorpe and a packing centre in Eakring Road, Mansfield.

There is no indication of the cause of the fire but the Environment Agency said there was plastic waste in the unit.

Nobile Foods' plant in Walesby has been burning into a third day after plastic waste caught fire - but Environment Agency officials have revealed that the company doesn't have a licence to store waste there. (Image James Day).
Nine fire engines and over 50 team members were on site at the peak of the operation.