`

Mansfield PSCO who played the piano to a 93-year-old theft victim is taking a break from the force to teach in Asia

A Mansfield PSCO who "made the day" of a 93-year-old theft victim by playing him the piano is taking a break from Nottinghamshire Police to teach in Asia.

PCSO Craig Bull is now heading off to teach in Myanmar formally Burma, Asia.

PCSO Craig Bull is taking a career break to teach in Myanmar formally Burma, Asia.

PCSO Craig Bull is taking a career break to teach in Myanmar formally Burma, Asia.

He has been a PCSO within the Neighbourhood Policing Team for eight-and-a-half-years, as well as serving as a Special Constable for six months.

He began his career in Warsop for a year, and then moved on to the Ladybrook and Grange Farm beats in Mansfield.

He has continued to build up a relationship with the community, having completed a ‘virtual walk from London to Venice’ to raise money for Cancer Research.

Speaking about his new venture, PCSO Craig Bull said: “I’ve always enjoyed passing knowledge on and it will be an exciting and hopefully rewarding time. It will add to my understanding of the five other languages I’ve studied already – but I’m expecting reading Burmese to be quite difficult!

“I’ve really enjoyed working with many different colleagues, teams, Sergeants, Inspectors and partnership agencies and I’ve made many friends throughout my time with the police. Although I’m rather sad to be leaving, I’m really excited and looking forward to it. I’ve been ordered by several colleagues to keep posting updates to keep in touch.”

You may recognise PCSO Bull after a video of him playing the piano for a 93-year-old man in Mansfield went viral.

The man had been the victim of a burglary and Craig had been to re-visit him following the incident.

Overnight the video received tens of thousands of views around the world, reaching the USA, Canada, Australia, Madagascar, Asia and the majority of Europe.

He has decided to take this career break now due to “it being the right time before the opportunity passes by”.

He will study for one month in the city on Yangon (Rangoon) to obtain his TESOL qualification (Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages) before moving onto his placement in the capital city of Naypyidaw, where he will begin teaching English to school children, adults and teachers.

Craig has always been keen to volunteer to try new technology and pass on knowledge, including delivering classes for other officers when new BlackBerry devices were rolled out and he has also successfully tutored four new PCSOs.

Inspector Nick Butler said: “Craig has led the way with social media and the video of him playing the piano had thousands of views across the globe. On the back of this video, we had people contact us asking how they could help us and volunteer. Some of these volunteers are about to start with us the month Craig leaves so this is a really fitting tribute to the legacy he has left.

“I know Craig will really enjoy his new role and this will benefit all the lives he touches in Burma. We look forward to keeping in touch and learning about his exciting adventure overseas. Good luck and thank you.”