Mansfield dementia patients ‘starved of the care they need’ in the community, Alzheimer’s Society says

editorial image

Shocking figures from the Alzheimer’s society have revealed a 70 per cent increase in avoidable hospital admissions of over-65s with dementia since 2012.

Reasons for the admissions included falls, UTIs , dehydration and delerium.

Tesa Allen, Alzheimer’s society services manager in Nottinghamshire said: “Successive governments have shirked the issue of our threadbare social care system. Starved of the care they need, local people with dementia end up in A&E in Nottinghamshire’s hospitals as a last resort, disrupting their home life and forcing them to struggle in crowded hospital wards.”

She added: “It shouldn’t and needn’t be like this. 1300 people in the Mansfield area have dementia and that number is likely to rise. The Government must work out how it will deliver high quality social care to everyone with dementia who needs it, and at a fair price.”

Much of the increase is thought to be due to inadequate care in the community piling pressure on A&E and ambulance services.

Sue Batty, an adult social care and health service director from Nottinghamshire County Council, said: “We are committed to working with health partners to reduce hospital admissions by identifying local residents at risk, including people with Alzheimer’s, and putting in place the necessary health and social care support.

“Despite ongoing pressures this is a priority area for the Council as we have maintained our spending on supporting people with memory and cognitive conditions such as Alzheimer’s across the county, which totalled £29.5m last year.

“This support includes home care, residential and nursing placements, respite care and short breaks, and day service activities.”

Dementia deaths are rising year on year and 225,000 people will develop dementia this year nationally.

To find out more about Alzheimer’s Society support in Mansfield, or to volunteer, call 0115 934 3800