Mansfield ranks lowest for food hygiene in East Midlands, according to latest report

No region in the East Midlands has a lower average rating than 4 overall.
No region in the East Midlands has a lower average rating than 4 overall.

Mansfield has ranked the lowest for food hygiene in East Midlands, according to a report.

The report by High Speed Training which looked into a quarter of a million food businesses across the UK found that Mansfield has the lowest rating for food hygiene in the East Midlands, with an overall average of 4.11.

This was closely followed by Leicester (4.12) and Northampton (4.12).

Positively, however, no region in the East Midlands has a lower average rating than 4 overall.

These are the food hygiene ratings of all the Mansfield area takeaways inspected in 2018

Lee Batchelor, who led the data team on the project, said: “Our report aims to improve consumers’ understanding of the Food Hygiene Rating Scheme and the Scottish Food Hygiene Information Scheme, so they can make informed decisions around where to eat and drink.

“The ratings are based on more than just personal hygiene. There are different areas of inspection and the schemes do have their limitations. It’s just about understanding that and knowing where to get the right information”.

Further UK wide analysis showed Walsall (3.68), Luton (3.78) and Bolton (3.83) were among the lowest rated places in the UK.

Harrogate (4.85), Hastings (4.82) and Southport (4.76) were among the highest rated towns in the UK for food hygiene.

The report found that takeaways were the biggest offenders across the UK, with 1 in 9 rated two or lower. This comes as Just Eat announces their plans to invest £1 million into a food safety programme and introduce a minimum standard rating of 3 for all new restaurant sign ups.

Wales and Northern Ireland, where it is compulsory to display your food hygiene rating, have an overall higher rating of food hygiene compared with England.

The calls for the mandatory display of food hygiene ratings in England and Scotland are increasing, with Brexit seen as an opportunity for this to be looked at once more.

However, with the current political uncertainty in the UK, there is yet to be any legislation tabled.

Eilidh Paton, Chartered Environmental Health Officer in Glasgow, says for consumers in Scotland: “Overall, I believe that the public should educate themselves on a business’s rating, as those that are ‘improvement required’ are generally not operating according to the law”.