Notts Police commissioner pledges £350k to ‘make our communities safer’

New funding to reduce crimes in our communities has been pledged by the police as part of a bid to “support young people to become safe”.

Nottinghamshire’s police and crime commissioner Paddy Tipping revealed that the county’s police would be launching the new £350,000 scheme, which he hopes will protect youngsters and put a stop to violence “in all its forms”.

The Nottinghamshire Police and Crime Commissioner, Paddy Tipping, right, and PCSO Keith Crowhurst, pictured on their walkabout around Bilsthorpe on Monday.

The Nottinghamshire Police and Crime Commissioner, Paddy Tipping, right, and PCSO Keith Crowhurst, pictured on their walkabout around Bilsthorpe on Monday.

Speaking at Nottinghamshire’s knife crime symposium, he announced plans to empower local communities and voluntary groups to tackle the root causes of knife crime, serious violence and prevent young people from becoming the next victim.

He announced £250,000 would be available for grassroots community safety projects through his ‘community safety fund for 2020-21.

But in a “double boost” for community groups he revealed a further £100,000 was being invested by Nottinghamshire’s violence reduction unit to create a combined fund of £350,000.

Mr Tipping said: “Each and every one of us has a responsibility to support young people to become safe and active members of their community and to help them to achieve their potential.

“That is what this event is all about.

“It takes the whole community to raise a child and it is imperative we intervene early to reduce the risks and prevent further tragedies on our streets.

“We need passion, unity and sustained effort to nurture the next generation of young people and ensure we put a stop to violence in all its forms. On the street, online and in the home.

“This funding will empower communities to work together and deliver vital intervention now.”

Mr Tipping added that “tightly-knitted, cohesive communities”, where people support each other, share problems and jointly work towards solutions, are “critical” to discouraging people from “making harmful life choices which impact negatively on everybody”.

The knife crime symposium, attended by the crime commissioner, saw senior church leaders from across Nottinghamshire come together to agree that “more action is needed” to tackle youth violence.

It examined how the church could play a proactive role in reducing serious violence in “key hotspots” of Nottinghamshire, by working together with public authorities and partners.