`

Charity cheer at Inner Wheel ladies’ masquerade ball

Guests Rob and Sue Pasierb in Venetian masks.
Guests Rob and Sue Pasierb in Venetian masks.

Fun, friendship and fundraising were the key to a successful masquerade charity ball held by the ladies of the Inner Wheel Club of Warsop.

Almost 200 members and guests, all wearing suitable masks, flocked to the John Fretwell Sporting Complex for the ball, which was the first the club had held since it was formed in 1972.

Helen Tomlinson (right), president of the Inner Wheel Club of Warsop, with Karen Chapman.

Helen Tomlinson (right), president of the Inner Wheel Club of Warsop, with Karen Chapman.

They tucked into a three-course meal before dancing the night away to music from The Sway Allstars Orchestra, who came up for London to ensure that the night was a swinging success. The band played songs through the decades and kept the dancefloor buzzing all night.

The club, which has 45 members, was supported by its sister Inner Wheel organisations from Kirkby, Mansfield and Sherwood Forest, while Katie Trinder, of Mansfield 103.2 was compere for the evening.

Hundreds of pounds were raised for Autism East Midlands (AEM), which is the chosen charity for the year of club president Helen Tomlinson. It is a cause close to Helen’s heart because many people she knows have been affected by the challenges that autism can bring.

Helping to raise funds was a bubble-tower tombola and a hamper raffle, Many of the prizes were donated by local businesses and well-wishers, as well as by club members.

Christine Fretwell, wearing a cat mask, attends to the tombola tower.

Christine Fretwell, wearing a cat mask, attends to the tombola tower.

AEM was started 50 years ago by parents desperate to help their children. As the children grew up, the range of care needed extended into adulthood.

A spokeswoman for the Inner Wheel club, Rioja Riches, said: “Helen was thrilled that the club chose to support her as AEM celebrates 50 years of support.

“As Inner Wheel is a women’s charity, based around fun and friendship, the aspects of autism that affect women and girls were of keen interest to everyone.

“Autism can be very different in women and girls and is often missed or misdiagnosed. But it is a complex, lifelong condition that affects the development of communication, social skills and life skills.

Katie Trinder, of Mansfield 103.2, who was compere for the evening.

Katie Trinder, of Mansfield 103.2, who was compere for the evening.

“It affects how individuals perceive the world and interact with others. While there is no cure, much can be done to help people live full and independent lives with the right support, education and care.”