Authorities were warned of dangers of road where tragic Meden Vale deaths took place

Sandra and Michael Dangerfield
Sandra and Michael Dangerfield

A Meden Vale couple say they tried to alert authorities about cars speeding on a “dangerous” road before the tragic death of a husband and wife.

Howard and Rita Maddock, both 74, live at Gleadthorpe Cottages, on Netherfield Lane, close to where Michael and Sandra Dangerfield were killed after they were struck by a car on Sunday, October 15.

Since moving to their home just over two years ago, the pair have contacted local authorities about drivers speeding on the 30mph limit road.

They wrote numerous letters to Nottinghamshire County Council, their local Mansfield District Councillors, Nottinghamshire Police, crime commissioner Paddy Tipping and former Mansfield MP Alan Meale.

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Mr Maddock said: “They have not listened to us, no one seems to take the blind bit of notice. Some drivers do double the speed limit, and it’s not a quiet road.”
“I feel very sad that it has come to this, we used to see them, the couple who were killed, they used to walk by here every day.

Netherfield Lane

Netherfield Lane

“We badgered and badgered highways to try and get something done. We said it was only a matter of time before something happened.”

Mrs Maddock said she felt “angry” that they had not been listened to.

Just the day before the collision, she had written to Ben Bradley MP to inform him of the dangers of the road. In an email she wrote: “I feel that it is only time before a major accident happens”.

The couple suggested rumble strips or repeater signs be installed to warn drivers of the speed limit and encourage them to slow down.

Howard and Rita Maddock outside their home on Netherfield Lane

Howard and Rita Maddock outside their home on Netherfield Lane

They received replies from Nottinghamshire County Council that the authority, due to “diminishing resources”, could only take action at sites where there was a “significant and persistent treatable accident pattern”.