Albanian murderer extradited from Mansfield found BACK in the UK

We interviewed Selami in 2009 before he was extradited.
We interviewed Selami in 2009 before he was extradited.

A convicted killer who was deported after authorities discovered he escaped jail for murder and was living in Mansfield is to be deported for a second time.

Albanian Selami Cokaj, 43, was reportedly convicted of stabbing a man to death in his home country in 1994, according to the Sun and Daily Mail newspaper, and escaped jail by fleeing to the UK and laying low in Mansfield, running a small car washing business and making £40,000 a year.

The Chad originally revealed that a Mansfield man was wanted by Interpol for crimes in Albania a decade ago.

The Chad originally revealed that a Mansfield man was wanted by Interpol for crimes in Albania a decade ago.

But after the courts extradited him in 2009, there are reports he is back in the UK, and living under his own name in Leicestershire.

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MP wants Albanian murderer extradited

The face of a convicted murderer

Albanian killer who lived in Mansfield to be extradited

The man gave an exclusive interview to the Chad in 2008 and claimed his extradition was a case of “mistaken identity”.

He claimed his name was Valtron Gashi, a refugee from Kosovo and father of four, and said his life would be in danger if he was sent back to Eastern Europe.

After initially being bailed by the courts and attempting a three-year asylum process, Westminister Magistrates' Court ordered his deportation back to Albania in March 2009.

A home office spokesman said the government is ‘seeking his deportation’.

They added: "This Government puts the safety of our families, communities and country first and we are determined to deport any foreign national offender who poses a threat to the UK.

“We have taken action like introducing ‘deport first appeal later’ to stop this kind of thing happening.”

The 'deport first, appeal later' policy means that appeals must now be brought from abroad unless there is a risk of serious irreversible harm and 2014 legislation also “makes it clear to the courts where the balance of the public interest lies when considering deportation” said the Home Office spokesman.

Since the rules came in the number of Human Rights appeals against criminal deportations has reduced from 356 to 11 in 2015.

Foreign nationals in the UK who are the subject of extradition requests are referred to UK Visas and Immigration who consider whether, in light of the extradition request, there are grounds to revoke that individual's residence status in the UK.