Mansfield secondary school praises 'achievements' after being ordered to improve

Leaders at one of Mansfield's largest secondary schools have praised parts of its recent Ofsted inspection, despite being ordered to improve.

In its most recent inspection, the Queen Elizabeth's Academy, on Chesterfield Road South, was deemed to have a higher rate than the national average for pupil absences and exclusions and was ordered to provide more specialist support for children with special educational needs.

Pictures: Queen Elizabeth's Academy.

Pictures: Queen Elizabeth's Academy.

The watchdog also found that more provisions were necessary to allow pupils access to subjects such as drama, music and geography.

But the school was praised by the inspector for the way staff "build pupils' confidence" and found that students are "happy, proud members of the school".

The inspector advised that the school "strengthens pupils' progress" by ensuring activities meet "the right level of challenge", but said leaders were "ambitious" and that staff morale was "high".

READ MORE: Mansfield secondary school with 'high rate of exclusions' ordered to improve
The school was also recommended to "reduce pupils' absence and exclusion, especially for pupils with special educational needs".

Pictures: Queen Elizabeth's Academy.

Pictures: Queen Elizabeth's Academy.

In response to the inspection, Helena Brothwell, former principal of Queen Elizabeth’s Academy said: “I am so proud of what our team and community have achieved so far. We researched and devised an approach to school improvement that we felt would work well for the academy and our students.

"The ‘QEA way’, as it is known, has sought to address gaps in student’s knowledge and understanding, and to transform the style of teaching delivered, so that all of our students can

achieve their full potential.

"I am delighted to see that Ofsted acknowledged how we ‘work with integrity’ and were able to experience the supportive environment in which our teachers, students and parents work well together.”

Pictures: Queen Elizabeth's Academy.

Pictures: Queen Elizabeth's Academy.

Assessing the school on five key areas, Ofsted found that the school requires improvement in its effectiveness of leadership, quality of teaching and outcome for pupils, while personal development and behaviour and its post-16 centre were viewed as 'good'.

In its report, the watchdog said: "Leaders are deeply committed to their work. Despite this, leadership and management require improvement. This is because leaders’ actions have not had a great enough impact on the overall quality of pupils’ education.

"The quality of teaching and learning requires improvement because it is not consistently good across all subjects and year groups. Though improving, the impact of teaching varies.

"However, almost all teachers are fully qualified subject specialists. Teachers have good subject knowledge. Where teachers communicate this knowledge well, it has a strong impact on pupils’ learning.

Pictures: Queen Elizabeth's Academy.

Pictures: Queen Elizabeth's Academy.

"The school’s work to promote pupils’ personal development and welfare is good. Many pupils start at the school with low attainment. These pupils often have little confidence in their ability to learn.

"Pupils enjoy school. Staff make sure that pupils’ emotional and physical well-being are a priority. Leaders invest heavily in pupils’ health. For example, every day starts with the offer of a free breakfast so that pupils are well-nourished and able to learn."

Pictures: Queen Elizabeth's Academy.

Pictures: Queen Elizabeth's Academy.