College exhibition is a hive of creativity by aspiring new artists

Marcus Annable treated visitors to live singing and music.
Marcus Annable treated visitors to live singing and music.

Aspiring artists, designers and performers at West Nottinghamshire College in Mansfield showcased their work at the college’s annual Arts Fest 2019.

Examples on display included contemporary and fine art, graphic design, photography, screen-printing, textiles, jewellery-making, pottery, and more.

Alexandru Axinescu revealed his characters inspired by Japanese comic art, known as manga.

Alexandru Axinescu revealed his characters inspired by Japanese comic art, known as manga.

For the first time the exhibition also featured work by students attending adult and community learning courses in subjects such as ceramics, and drawings and paintings by children aged seven to 11 who attended the college’s Saturday morning art workshops, plus exhibits by art and design tutors and technicians.

In the viewing gallery visitors were treated to live singing and guitar-based music by performing arts student Marcus Annable.

Meanwhile, second year performing arts students put on a performance of Machinal – a 1928 play inspired by the real-life case of convicted and executed murderer Ruth Snyder.

Lee Johnson, an art and design student specialising in photography, exhibited a range of images capturing the natural landscape and wildlife.

Kay Madison Russ showcased a range of photographic subjects including portraits, architecture and urban landscapes.

Kay Madison Russ showcased a range of photographic subjects including portraits, architecture and urban landscapes.

Fellow art and design student Kay-Madison Russ, who also specialised in photography, showcased work across several styles, including urban landscapes in Manchester and scenes from Yorkshire Sculpture Park.

Second year student Alexandru Axinescu showcased characters inspired by Japanese manga art, while adult learner Rosalind Manson exhibited two raku-fired bottles produced in an evening community pottery-making course at the college.

She said: “I always wanted to have a go at pottery but never had chance due to work commitments.

“This was the ideal venue. I’ve met new people and learnt a new skill, so it’s been marvellous.

Lee Johnson exhibited a range of images capturing the natural landscape and nature.

Lee Johnson exhibited a range of images capturing the natural landscape and nature.

Kerry Pilcher, head of department at media, music, performing and visual arts, said: “Students have produced outstanding and eye-catching work across a range of disciplines and showcased their creativity, and the skills and knowledge gained during their studies, to a very high professional standard.

“It never ceases to amaze me how much our learners develop and grow as artists and performers.

“The art exhibition and final acting performance was a truly fitting platform to demonstrate their artistic and creative journey to an extremely appreciative audience.

“Most students will now head off to university to further their learning while others will return to college in September to complete their studies and produce even more inspiring work.”

Rosalind Manson exhibited two raku-fired bottles that she made on a community pottery-making course.

Rosalind Manson exhibited two raku-fired bottles that she made on a community pottery-making course.

Performing arts students Ashleigh Murray and Colm Humphreys as Helen Jones and Richard Roe respectively in Machinal.

Performing arts students Ashleigh Murray and Colm Humphreys as Helen Jones and Richard Roe respectively in Machinal.