‘Unbeatable’ Ollie Hynd determined to get even faster as he plots Rio de Janeiro glory

England's Oliver Hynd with his Gold medal as he celebrates victory in the Men's 200m Individual Medley SM8 Final.
England's Oliver Hynd with his Gold medal as he celebrates victory in the Men's 200m Individual Medley SM8 Final.
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When you’re an elite-level sports star standing still with your performance levels is simply not an option.

Aside from the fierce competition all around as rivals look to knock you off your lofty pedestal, the inner fires burn deep with the desire to achieve total perfection.

England's Oliver Hynd with his Gold medal as he celebrates victory in the Men's 200m Individual Medley SM8 Final at Tollcross Swimming Centre, during the 2014 Commonwealth Games in Glasgow. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Picture date: Monday July 28, 2014. See PA story COMMONWEALTH Swimming. Photo credit should read: Andrew Milligan/PA Wire. RESTICTIONS: Editorial use only. No commercial use. No video emulation.

England's Oliver Hynd with his Gold medal as he celebrates victory in the Men's 200m Individual Medley SM8 Final at Tollcross Swimming Centre, during the 2014 Commonwealth Games in Glasgow. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Picture date: Monday July 28, 2014. See PA story COMMONWEALTH Swimming. Photo credit should read: Andrew Milligan/PA Wire. RESTICTIONS: Editorial use only. No commercial use. No video emulation.

And, despite becoming the first person in the history of disability swimming to hold all four major titles at the same time, Kirkby’s Ollie Hynd says he wants to get even faster.

“I will have a break until September or October to recharge the batteries and then me and my coach Glenn Smith will pick up where we left off,” said Ollie.

“We will look at my races, analyse them and work out where things can be improved.

“We will work on certain areas such as fitness and strength levels.

A collections of medals won by Ollie Hynd.

A collections of medals won by Ollie Hynd.

“I feel I can improve on my turns to improve in medley. It is all about improving my times by a second or even a half a second.”

The record-breaking 19 year-old, who suffers from neuromuscular myopathy and associated limb deformities, wrote himself into sporting history in July when he secured gold in the 200m SM8 medley at the Commonwealth Games in Glasgow.

That glorious gold added to the 200m SM8 individual medley European title he won in Berlin in 2011, the Paralmypic title gained at London 2012 and the World Championship crown in Montreal in 2013.

It is an amazing feat that only Becky Adlington and David Wilkie have managed to achieved in able-bodied swimming.

Oliver Hynd in action during the heats of the Mens MC 200M Individual Merdley.

Oliver Hynd in action during the heats of the Mens MC 200M Individual Merdley.

“It’s been a crazy time for me and I am just thrilled to have achieved what I wanted to do,” added Ollie.

“I have worked really hard in the pool with Glenn to get to this point and am just really happy that it has paid off.

“Racing and training are two very different things, racing is a skill and to get the Commonwealth gold is very special.

“To have made history in this way is special. It all still feels a little strange and is only just starting to sink in now that I have had some time off to reflect on things,

“I have been lucky enough to represent Team England and am really proud to be the first disability sportsperson to hold all four swimming titles.”

Hynd first burst on to the scene at the 2011 IPC European Championships where he won the 200m individual medley in a new European record and has not looked back since.

But rather than putting his feet up and reflecting on a job well done, the determined teen is ready to dig even deeper in his quest to add a gold in Rio to his already glittering collection.

“I have got good experience as well as all four titles, which helps take the pressure off,” said Hynd

“This is a great step for me towards the Parlaympic games in Rio.

“All athletes are focusing on Rio now. We are halfway there and we will start to put in place a plan of action of how we will approach the year building up to Rio.

“Hopefully I will be able to achieve what I want to do in Brazil. You never know who is going to burst on the scene because there is a lot of great talent out there.

“All I can do is control what I control and that is the times that I swim. I want to keep improving.”

Away from the pool Hynd is also keeping himself busy as he works hard to inspire the next generation as part of the Swim Britain initiative.

The scheme aims to boost water safety for youngsters and bring families together through the sport.

Said Hynd: “This is a great initiative to get people of all ages swimming and to get children water safe.

“Swimming is a great sport that anyone can be involved in, whether you are able bodied, disabled, young or old.

“It is important that we inspire the next generation to come through and, as athletes, we have a responsibility to do that.

“The scheme is achieving great things and I am proud to be a part of it.”