Rebecca Adlington backed to cope with London 2012 pressures

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GOLDEN girl Rebecca Adlington is being backed to cope with the intense pressure upon her shoulders following her impressive qualification for the London Olmypics.

Dominant Adlington comfortably qualified to defend both her 400m and 800m titles after cruising through the selection trials at last week’s British Swimming Championships.

And, as the games draw ever nearer, Adlington is likely to come under a growing spotlight as the national media and sports fans pin their hopes on Becky to repeat her amazing success in Beijing.

But proud mum Kay is backing Becky to learn from her Beijing experience and thrive under the pressure.

Said Kay: “The pressure on Becky this year will be way more than the last Olympics. Back then nobody outside swimming knew who she was, now she is the defending champion at her home Olympics.

“Becky is going to be in the national spotlight, but I think she will be better prepared this time.

“Becky was only 19 back then and that kind of pressure of media spotlight is hard to cope with. She is older and maturer now and has learnt a lot about herself. She has learnt from the bad times.

“She also knows what it is like to win the Olympics and what pressures come with it.

“Whatever will be will be. Becky is up against some great competitors, all of them deserve respect because you do not know what they can achieve.

“Becky has put in an awful lot of hardwork and committment and it is nice to see Becky being a role model to the young swimmers who see what she has done and want to achieve it for themselves.

“Swimming has given Becky some wonderful opportunities that she would never have had otherwise. Obviously I am biased, but you can do a lot worse than Becky as a role model.”

Becky is the current world record holder over 800m after she smashed the 19 year-old world record of Janet Evans.

Adlington became Britain’s first Olympic swimming champion since 1988 and the first British swimmer to win two Olympic gold medals since 1908 and Great Britain’s most successful Olympic swimmer in 100 years.