Recipes on the menu at Mansfield Museum

NMAC11-1853-1''Jodie Henshaw Development Officer at Mansfield Museum pictured with some of the old cookery books that inspired this summers exhibition
NMAC11-1853-1''Jodie Henshaw Development Officer at Mansfield Museum pictured with some of the old cookery books that inspired this summers exhibition

TRADITIONAL home cooking could make a comeback thanks to Mansfield Museum’s plan for a modern version of recipe books not seen since the 1800s.

As part of a summer exhibition, staff at the museum are appealing for families to submit their home kitchen specialities to create a cookery book.

The idea was inspired by 19th and early 20th century church cook books featuring the recipes of town folk, held in the museum’s archives.

While reading of traditional dishes including vinegar cake and banana omelette, staff realised generations of new dishes could produce a new version.

Said museum curator Liz Weston: “Looking through them it helps you to remember how our lives have changed; it’s a window into the heritage of the town.”

Among the museum’s collection is a unique handwritten 1850 recipe book by a Mrs Hunt, cook to the Brodhurst family of Crow Hill House, thought top have been in the area of Crow Hill Drive.

Her specialties include ‘Prince Albert Pudding’ with an egg and citrus-based filling, steam cooked for two hours.

Added museum development officer Jodie Henshaw: “You can see how cooking has changed, there was a lot more baking and re-using going on and people were more likely to use bits left over from other meals.”

As part of summer exhibition ‘Our Local Larder: Mansfield Food Past & Present’, staff also hope to find a baker willing to re-create the traditional Mansfield gooseberry pie, a now extinct July fair tradition.