Public satisfaction with Nottinghamshire County Council at record levels, survey shows

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Public satisfaction with Nottinghamshire County Council is at its highest ever level according to a new survey of county residents.

Nearly two-thirds of residents surveyed (63 per cent) said that they were very or fairly satisfied with the way Nottinghamshire County Council runs things in the 2012 Annual Residents Satisfaction Survey.

The satisfaction rating is an increase of 16 per cent on last year. Just 16 per cent of those asked said they were dissatisfied, with the remaining 21 per cent expressing no opinion either way.

More than 1,000 residents from across the county took part in face-to-face interviews for the survey, carried out by leading polling company IPSOS Mori.

They were asked a series of questions including how satisfied they were with the Council and their area as a place to live, how well informed they were about council services and the extent to which they felt they could influence decisions.

The previous highest satisfaction score for the County Council was 47 per cent in 2011, 2006/07 and 2003/04, with the lowest being 34 per cent is 2009/10.

And the latest satisfaction rating compares very favourably with other Councils in the UK. In 2011, the average rating for local authorities was 41 per cent.

The initial findings of the survey are to be reported when the Council meets this Thursday, 20th December.

Coun Kay Cutts, leader of Nottinghamshire County Council, welcomed the findings and said: “The views of Nottinghamshire residents are extremely important to us. Although there is no longer a statutory requirement to measure satisfaction levels, we have chosen to continue with the annual survey because we can use the information to improve services.

“The results of this year’s survey are very encouraging. Not only has overall satisfaction with the way the Council runs things increased dramatically, the number of people who said they would speak positively about the County Council has risen by 24 per cent.

“I am particularly pleased that the number of people who believe the County Council provides value for money has almost doubled - recognition that frontline services have been protected, and in many cases improved in Nottinghamshire, whilst we have frozen council tax for three successive years and plan to do so again in 2013/14.

“We now hope to carry out more detailed analysis of the responses to find out how we can improve further. This will show us if there are any particular areas of the county or age groups where satisfaction levels are not so high and allow us to make further improvements.”