Pokemon Go players advised to take care in the countryside

Facebook user Dean Bullimore mocked up this image of him sneaking up on a level 36 Charizard.
Facebook user Dean Bullimore mocked up this image of him sneaking up on a level 36 Charizard.
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While you’re trying to catch’em all, make sure you don’t get caught out on private land.

Pokémon Go players have been advised to stay safe in the countryside and avoid trespassing on private property while in pursuit of Pikachu.

This Drowzee Pokemon was spotted in Worksop Town centre by a player.

This Drowzee Pokemon was spotted in Worksop Town centre by a player.

The CLA which represents farmers, landowners, and rural businesses, said it has received several reports from its members of players trespassing while using their smartphones to hunt for animated characters in the real world.

CLA Director of Policy and Advice Christopher Price said: “It’s great that Pokémon Go players are getting out into the countryside and exploring our beautiful landscapes, but they should be aware that it is a workplace and treat it with respect. Players should take steps to remain safe and be aware of the risks of trespassing over private land and property. Damage can be caused by inadvertently walking on land set aside for environmental work or you could find yourself face to face with dangerous livestock. Players should also be aware of farm machinery, particularly during harvest time.”

Pokémon Go follows other digital software such as satellite navigational systems, Google Street View, Strava and Geocaching, which the CLA said has the potential to encourage trespassing on private property unless adequate safeguards are put in place.

Mr Price said: “We hope the makers of Pokémon Go will deal with any instances of characters apparent on private property quickly and that it is made as easy as possible to report these issues.”

Top tips from the CLA for Pokémon Go players to stay safe and legal in the countryside:

· be aware of your surroundings at all times;

· stick to designated public rights of way as marked on the map or sign posts;

· keep dogs on a lead around farm animals and horses, but let the lead go if they give chase;

· leave gates and property as you find them; and

· follow the Countryside Code.