Nottinghamshire residents’ chips help power the National Grid

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Nottinghamshire residents have been praised for creating enough carbon neutral electricity to make over one and a half million cups of tea, all by recycling their used cooking oil.

In fact, the scheme, which sees used cooking oil recovered into green electricity, has proven so successful that Nottinghamshire County Council, in partnership with waste contractor Veolia Environmental Services, has extended the service to all its household waste recycling centres across the county.

Coun Richard Butler, chairman of Nottinghamshire County Councils Environment Committee, said: “It’s proved to be a very innovative scheme and we’re delighted to extend the service across the county to enable all residents to participate. He added ‘Nottinghamshire’s Household Waste Recycling Centres are amongst the highest performers in the UK and this is just another example of how we are working with Nottinghamshire residents to make a real difference.”

Each year it costs UK water companies an average of £15 million to clear blockages caused by fats and greases being tipped away down drains, where it clogs up and causes damage to drains.

However, the recycling scheme, operated by Nottingham based eco-firm Living Fuels sees used cooking oil turned into a valuable resource which helps lower the country’s dependence on fossil fuels.

Once the used cooking oil is collected from the Nottinghamshire sites, it is taken to Living Fuels’ state-of-the-art recovery facility, where it is recovered 100% naturally into a clean, green bioliquid, LF100. This bioliquid is then used in Living Fuels’ renewable energy facilities to provide carbon neutral electricity to the National Grid at times of unexpected power demand.

Just one litre of waste oil can create enough green energy to make 240 cups of tea. One full recycling centre tank provides enough to power a home for an entire year.

Rob Murphy, operations director for Living Fuels, said of the scheme: “It’s brilliant to see residents taking so well to a service that provides a way to get rid of a difficult waste stream, whilst at the same time helping to create clean, green electricity for UK homes and businesses.”

Kevin Parker, regional communications manager, Veolia Environmental Services, added: “It’s a great initiative and has proved to be a success but we’d really like more people to participate so we can make an even bigger difference’’.

Pictured are Steve Mitchell, Coun Richard Butler, Rob Murphy and Tina Towlson, site manager West Bridgford HWRC.