Mystery of missing speed in Papplewick

Brian Staples who is puzzled as to who has removed the new 30mph road signs along Moor Road where he lives in Papplewick.
Brian Staples who is puzzled as to who has removed the new 30mph road signs along Moor Road where he lives in Papplewick.
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Speed signs in Papplewick have mysteriously disappeared over the weekend.

Around 12 yellow plastic signs urging motorists to remember “It’s 30 for a reason” were removed from the village, along with a metal 30mph speed camera sign that was opposite the Griffin’s Head pub.

Brian Staples, who led a campaign to have the signs instated and the speed limit reduced from 40mph to 30mph, discovered the signs were missing on Sunday morning.

He said: “This is a mystery! I realised it happened because I had one smack outside my house and it had disappeared. I went for a drive to have a look for them and saw that half a dozen had been taken from Moor Road and four more from Main Street. Every one had gone! It’s weird! They must have used bolt-cutters to remove the one opposite.”

The two ft by 18 ins signs were put up earlier this year in an initiative by Nottinghamshire County Council (NCC) and Nottinghamshire police. They were all attached by tie-wraps and Mr Staples believes they could have been removed with strong scissors.

He said: “I complained on behalf of my neighbours last year to get the signs put up. Cars were howling down here past kids and OAPs. You can’t have a 40mph spped limit by a housing estate. The signs do work. They prick peoples’ conscience. The normal flow of traffic has slowed right down.”

He added that a speed trap by police caught three speeders within 15 minutes.

“I am intrigued as to who has done it,” Mr Staples said.

A spokesman for NCC said: “Unfortunately, at the moment, there is no funding to replace them. As and when funding is found, Papplewick will be first on the list.”

In August, around 23 plastic signs, posted along the A60 between Ravenshead and Redhill, were stolen within two or three hours of being put up.

The roadside posters, which featured the image of a tombstone with the words “Slow Down, Speed Kills” carved on it, were aimed at young drivers between the ages of 17 and 30 who figure highly in accident statistics on rural roads.