Meden School is on the mend

.The head teacher of Meden school Dave Hooker meets up with the schools Chair of Governor Beverley Young to discuss the results of the first monitoring report since the school special measures status
.The head teacher of Meden school Dave Hooker meets up with the schools Chair of Governor Beverley Young to discuss the results of the first monitoring report since the school special measures status

INSPECTORS say Warsop’s Meden School is making good progress in its battle to move out of special measures.

The school and technology college was made subject to the additional scrutiny in March after watchdog Ofsted said it was ‘inadequate’.

Results of a first monitoring visit to assess how the school is doing now were published last Tuesday.

Three inspectors made a September visit and judged it was making ‘good’ progress in making key changes.

Exam results are also up and teaching is showing a ‘trend of improvement’.

Said headteacher Dave Hooker: “To get ‘good’ on the first monitoring visit in these circumstances is very rare because we’ve only had a few months to turn things around.

“It gives an indication we may be in special measures shorter than might have been expected, but that applies only provided we can maintain the progress.”

Following the March report a large proportion of staff left the school with 16 new teachers coming in.

Mr Hooker was appointed as headteacher after his predecessor, Kate Reid, resigned shortly after the March inspection.

Ofsted had said results were poor and teaching not good enough.

The school’s leadership structure has also since been overhauled and key policies and procedures changed.

Said the monitoring report: “The quality of teaching was good in more than half of the lessons seen.”

It added: “Clear improvements are to be seen in all area’s of the school’s work.”

The Burns Lane school’s summer 2011 exam results showed an 18 per cent improvement in the number of students getting five or more A* to C grades in key subjects. Around 1,300 pupils aged 11 to 18 are on the school’s books.

Said chairman of governors Beverley Young: “It’s a brilliant achievement so far and the governors are confident the improvements will continue.”

Added Mr Hooker: “This is another big step in the right direction. But we’re not there yet. We must make sure the improved attitude and behaviours shows itself in lessons.”