DCSIMG

Pop pair get political with World Cup tune

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Two Mansfield football fans have created their own World Cup anthem, after blowing the whistle on Gary Barlow’s official tune.

Mark Estell and Stephen Goalby have released their song, Come on England (Don’t Break My Heart), to get local fans in good voice for Brazil 2014.

The musical mates formed their band Politics of Pop earlier this year, but decided to record their own football track after hearing the Take That frontman’s new version of his hit single Greatest Day, featuring football legends Gary Lineker and Sir Geoff Hurst.

Mark, (pictured left) who works for a Mansfield design company, told Chad: “We got the idea to do and England song when we heard Gary Barlow’s Greatest Day’, or ‘great dismay’ as we call it. You can’t sing along to it and it’s not motivational.

“We thought we could do better, and I think we have. Our song’s funny and it’s got a rabble-rousing chorus. It’s something you can sing on the terraces.”

The video was filmed around Nottinghamshire, and features Mark and Stephen, who grew up in Mansfield and now lives in Arnold, wearing white boiler suits.

“We were going to buy a couple of England shirts for the video, but when we saw the £90 price tag we decided to make our own outfits from overalls and some red duct tape,” Mark added.

Come on England (Don’t Break My Heart) is available on iTunes.

It is the second recent World Cup song released by Mansfield artists, after Indie-funk band Roger The Mascot released their single Badboi(England What’s Going On?).

http://www.chad.co.uk/video/entertainment-and-lifestyle/roger-the-mascot-badboi-3546908974001

It follows a long list of footballing tunes, with fortunes as mixed as England’s.

Skiffle artist Lonnie Donegan performed the first ever official England World Cup song in 1966, with his long-forgotten jingle World Cup Willie.

‘Back Home’ (1970) began the tradition of the England squad mumbling badly in a recording studio - with the dismal ‘We’ve Got the Whole World at our Feet (1986) only reaching number 66 in the charts.

In 1998 Fat Les’s Vindaloo was narrowly pipped to the number one spot by Newman and Baddiel’s re-released Three Lions.

 

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