Lessons on waste and worms earn plaques for schools

The county councils Lydia Powles hands a plaque to Asquith youngsters and teaching assistant, Thespo Yournimou.
The county councils Lydia Powles hands a plaque to Asquith youngsters and teaching assistant, Thespo Yournimou.

Projects that have taught children about waste and helping the environment have earned special recognition for two primary schools in Mansfield.

Asquith and Berry Hill schools were awarded an EnviroGrant by waste contractor, Veolia, last year to help improve their outdoor spaces and learning.

The Asquith Street primary used the money to put up a fence to help develop a wormery, which converts food waste into compost, and a forest-focused education area for its nursery. And the Black Scotch Lane primary bought a bird feeder, tumble composter and a wormery for its foundation unit.

The two schools also held education sessions about composting and the usefulness of worms. Now both have received a commemorative plaque from Veolia to mark their work.

Alana Clarke, of Asquith, said: “It has been so good delivering these outdoor sessions. The wormery is a great tool to help the children see how our waste can create compost to grow our fruit and vegetables.”

Leanne Swain, of Berry Hill, said: “The children have so enjoyed using the composter and wormery and finding all the insects they can. We regularly have birds on out site now, using our bird feeder.”

VEOLIA is the waste contractor for Nottinghamshire County Council, whose designated schools waste action club helped the two Mansfield schools deliver their educational projects and lessons. The firm hands out EnviroGrants of up to £1,000 to not-for-profit community organisations for schemes that can improve the local environment.

Lea Hawkes, of Veolia, said: “It’s great that we were able to go out into the community and see how the grants were used by the schools and the difference they made. We hope other schools and groups take advantage and apply to us for these EnviroGrants.”