Health chiefs issue alcohol warning

File photo dated 01/12/06 of a man drinking a pint of beer. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Issue date: Monday October 31, 2011. 'Risky drinkers' who regularly consume more than the safe limits without binge drinking or getting drunk are unknowingly increasing their chances of developing cancer, liver disease and mental health issues, according to a report. More than a quarter of men (26%) are enjoying one too many - compared to only 18% of women, the study found. The pattern is increasing with age, with nearly one in three men over 45 (31%) regularly drinking more than they should. By contrast, the highest number of female risky drinkers are aged 16-24 (22%). Risky drinking is higher among professionals and those with the largest household incomes. See PA story HEALTH Alcohol. Photo credit should read: Johnny Green/PA Wire

File photo dated 01/12/06 of a man drinking a pint of beer. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Issue date: Monday October 31, 2011. 'Risky drinkers' who regularly consume more than the safe limits without binge drinking or getting drunk are unknowingly increasing their chances of developing cancer, liver disease and mental health issues, according to a report. More than a quarter of men (26%) are enjoying one too many - compared to only 18% of women, the study found. The pattern is increasing with age, with nearly one in three men over 45 (31%) regularly drinking more than they should. By contrast, the highest number of female risky drinkers are aged 16-24 (22%). Risky drinking is higher among professionals and those with the largest household incomes. See PA story HEALTH Alcohol. Photo credit should read: Johnny Green/PA Wire

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Derbyshire health leaders have warned that there is no such thing as a guaranteed safe level of drinking.

The message was sent out by NHS Hardwick Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) in the run-up to Christmas.

The CCG cautioned that people who regularly drink two large glasses of wine or two pints of strong beer double their chance of high blood pressure and treble their risk of developing mouth cancer.

The NHS says that men should not regularly drink more than three or four units of alcohol a day while women should not regularly exceed two or three units. People should avoid alcohol altogether for 48 hours after a heavy drinking session.

Dr Steve Lloyd, chairman of NHS Hardwick CCG, said: “Most people enjoy a sensible social drink, but at times, especially over the Christmas period, lots of people end up drinking more than is good for them.

“Drinking more than the recommended limit is a habit that it’s easy to fall into. But drinking just a little too much alcohol puts people at greater risk of developing serious illnesses including heart disease, stroke and cancer.

“People who drink too much are also far more likely to suffer traumatic injuries from falling over or being hit by moving vehicles. And anyone found guilty of drink driving could lose their licence, get a £5,000 fine, and be sentenced to up to six months in prison.

For advice on sensible drinking, visit www.nhs.uk/Livewell/alcohol.