Coal community focus of display

NMAC12-0450-1''Ch Ch Ch Changes exhibition at the Museum.''Sarah Harrison and Joe Kelly two of the artists listen to Sarah's audio instalation
NMAC12-0450-1''Ch Ch Ch Changes exhibition at the Museum.''Sarah Harrison and Joe Kelly two of the artists listen to Sarah's audio instalation

FROM Elvis impersonator to fungi forager, hare hunters to dog walkers, the new found jobs and hobbies of former miners and the change in our community landscape is the focus of a new exhibition at Mansfield Museum.

Mansfield born photographer David Severn has joined forces with a group of Nottingham artists to produce a collection of works through photography, collage, sculpture and audio recordings to capture the changing face of the district following the collapse of the mining industry.

NMAC12-0450-2''Ch Ch Ch Canges at the Museum.. Joe Kelly pictured with his headstocks.

NMAC12-0450-2''Ch Ch Ch Canges at the Museum.. Joe Kelly pictured with his headstocks.

“My own involvement in the project has been making a series of photographs looking at reinvented uses of former colliery sites and the social situation in Mansfield today,” explained David, whose father and grandfather both worked in the mines.

“This has given me the chance to explore my roots after moving away and then returning,” added David, who attended All Saints School.

“It has been a brilliant experience and allowed me to see the area through different eyes and meet some interesting characters along the way.”

The show explores issues surrounding the landscape, environmental and cultural changes in and around the Mansfield area following the closure of the coal mines.

It also identifies the alternative ways the former pit sites are now being used by the communities they once served.

The exhibition, called ‘Ch Ch Ch Changes’ is now open and runs until 14th April at the Leeming Street museum and is free to view. There will also be free workshops, run by the artists, for children during the Easter holidays based on performance, sculpture, collage, photography, 2D and 3D art.

The project has received funding from the Arts Council and follows a previous exhibition held in 2010.

Sarah Hemstock, of Kirkby, played a key part in securing the Lottery funding and created audio interviews of former miners and their memories, which will also feature in the expedition.

Sarah said: “We hope it will attract many visitors due to the emotive subject that people can connect to.”

l For more information go to www.mansfield.gov.uk/museum.