Asbestos fears at fly-tipping hotspot

Local resident John Hunter is complaining about flytipping in the area
Local resident John Hunter is complaining about flytipping in the area
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A Shirebrook man has voiced his anger after a council took nearly three weeks to remove asbestos from a fly-tipping hot spot.

John Hunter first reported his fears about the 12 sheets of grey material he found on a public footpath near Shirebrook sewage works to Mansfield District Council (MDC) on 11th August.

He called back a further two times before it was eventually removed on August 28th. MDC told the Chad there was a delay after samples from the asbestos were sent from the laboratory to the correct person at the council ‘due to a misunderstanding’ but that ‘the risk to health was minimal.’

Mr Hunter said: “It virtually took the council three weeks to get their act together. I thought that if this is the nasty stuff, it should have been actioned a lot quicker than it was. I was told they were waiting on the results of tests. But in the meantime little bits were getting broken off. This place is an identified fly-tipping site. MDC are well aware that all sorts has been dumped there.”

Mr Hunter says that the root-balls of cannabis plants have been dumped at the scene, as well as conifer cuttings, tyres, and black bin-bags containing clothing.

Coun Mick Barton, portfolio holder for public protection at MDC said: “We always endeavour to remove fly-tipping from public land as soon as possible after it is reported. When it is suspected that dumped rubbish contains asbestos, a sample must be taken and sent to a specialist laboratory for testing before it is removed. This is done to determine whether it is asbestos, and if so, what type. This will then determine who removes it and how it is removed and disposed of. On this occasion, unfortunately, due to a misunderstanding there was a delay in the results being sent from the laboratory to the correct person at the council. Due to the type of asbestos and the fact it was contained in solid sheeting, the risk to health was minimal.”